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More On The Implications of CIC Services

TweetShareSharePin0 Shares We are starting to see some fallout from last month’s CIC Services opinion. For example, Tax Notes’ Kristen Parillo discusses[$] Hancock Land Acquisitions v US , another microcaptive case. Parillo’s article explores the parties’ post CIC Services supplemental filings in a case where the taxpayer brought an action alleging that the IRS’s failure to refer its case

US IRS Flags Deadline For Q2 Estimated Tax Payments

TweetShareSharePin0 Shares by Mike Godfrey, Tax-News.com, Washington 09 June 2021 The US Internal Revenue Service has issued a reminder to taxpayers who pay estimated taxes that they have until June 15 to pay their estimated tax payment for the second quarter of tax year 2021 without incurring a penalty. Estimated tax is the method

Limitation on Issues Taxpayer Can Raise in Passport Case

TweetShareSharePin0 Shares The case of Shitrit v. Commissioner, T.C. Memo 2021-63 points out the limitations on raising issues other than the revocation of the passport when coming into the Tax Court under the jurisdiction of the passport provision.  Petitioner here tries to persuade the Tax Court to order the issuance of a refund but gets

A Closer Look at Eliminating the Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT)

TweetShareSharePin0 Shares In the Tax Foundation’s new Options for Reforming America’s Tax Code 2.0, there are several options that would simplify the tax code, including eliminating the alternative minimum tax (AMT). While this move would remove a source of complexity, policymakers should also consider reforming the deductions that created a justification for the AMT in

How Biden Would Tax Capital Gains At Death

TweetShareSharePin11 Shares President Biden has proposed major changes in the way the US taxes the assets of those who have died. There is a great deal of confusion about just what he’d do, in part due to the way the White House itself framed his proposals in an April fact sheet. I’ll try to explain

A First Step Toward A Global Minimum Tax

TweetShareSharePin22 Shares G-7 agrees to a 15 percent  minimum corporate tax framework. The group representing seven major industrialized nations backed the concept of a global minimum corporate tax rate of at least 15 percent. Companies would pay that rate regardless of their country of residence.  Some large companies like Amazon, Facebook, or Google, would pay
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